THE LIFE AND TIMES OF SHAYGAN KHERADPIR

Coriant Chief Executive Officer, Shaygan Kheradpir, is a technology and business executive known for his contributions to various initiatives including the development of FiOS at Verizon.

Shaygan Kheradpir was born on December 1964 in London. His father was an otorhinolaryngologist. His family moved to Iran where he grew up. He attended high school in Switzerland at Aiglon College. He was accepted to Cornell University where he earned a Bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering with a focus on control systems. He went on to earn a Master’s and Doctoral degree in the same field. Currently, Kheradpir is a member of Cornell University’s Engineering Council.

He started out at GTE Laboratories soon after graduating. Here, he worked on the management and control of network within the company. He was promoted at GTE Corporation on facebook.com to become the Chief Information Officer. Reports by the Wall Street Journal say, he was well respected for “delivering new products on schedule”.

In 2000, GTE Corporation and Bell Atlantic merged to form Verizon Communications. Kheradpir was appointed President of the e-business division at VerIzion. Later, he was promoted to the company’s first Chief Technology/Information Officer. He is credited with the automation of Verizon’s operations as well as the diversification of Verizon into a wider range of telecommunication services. He, along with his staff of about 7,000 people, developed Verizon’s FiOs as well as iobi, a product that manages address book, caller ID, among other features in devices.

Among his achievements at Verizon, Kheradpir helped reduce the company’s budget for information technology. Between 2000 and 2003, he reduced purchases made from technology vendors by 30% and reduced the company’s IT staff by 20%. He fought against Verizon’s policy against purchasing IT equipment auctioned by businesses on eBay.

Kheradpir joined Barclays bank in January 2011 as COO of the Global Retail Bank in London. He made a significant contribution to the development of products such as Pingit, a software for mobile payments. For this reason, he was promoted to Chief Technology Officer, becoming the first technology executive to sit on Barclays’ executive team. Kheradpir has been the catalyst for the change in Barclays’ culture that proved necessary for the bank’s transformation along the lines of the industrialization of the 21st century and innovation of products that actually make a difference in people’s lives.

Between January and November 2014, Kheradpir worked as CEO of Juniper Networks, a company pioneering within the networking industry in Silicon Valley. He was able to launch an Integrated Operating Plan that was in line with recommendations he received from activist investors to help decrease expenses while increasing dividends. Early this year, Kheradpir joined the management team at Coriant and was appointed CEO on September 28th. He took over from Pat DiPietro, the current Vice Chairman at Coriant.

Kheradpir has had other achievements outside his workplace. He served on a number of boards such as the Advisory Board of the YMCA between 2007 and 2010, and the Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology, a board of the U.S National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Slyce: Shopping for the Future

Ever run into the problem of seeing something you’ve just got to have but not knowing where to find it? Slyce can help you find the product your looking for with little to no hassle.

A leader in the field of visual and image recognition technology, Slyce is a start-up platform that allows the user to identify and search for different items through their smartphone or tablet. This company uses state of the art software that utilizes the different features of smart phones or tablets to better expand your shopping experience by using the identifying aspects of an object to connect you with what you are looking for. Along with using image recognition, these company also utilizes audio, video QR and barcode scanning to find the item of your choice. With so many ways to find different products there is no way you’ll be left empty-handed. Slyce is taking shopping and luxury into the future and making technology better work for the convenience of the user.

Founded by Cameron Chell and Erika Racicot, Slyce is focused on bringing an experience that the competition won’t be able to replicate. After the acquirement of similar company Pounce for $5 million, Slyce is now even better able to provide the technology needed to revolutionize the shopping experience. With this new technology, Slyce can make so that countless items will be only a click away with the added benefit of shopping from just about anywhere.

Slyce wants to become more than just one company in a sea of other nameless brands, it’s dedicated to being a standard in the world of cutting-edge technology and providing the consumer with an experience that will be truly unique. Slyce wants to provide you the ability to shop on your own terms and to find the products of your dreams with no added difficulty.

Slyce allows consumers to find information about a product using only a smartphone

Slyce, a startup company based in Toronto, develops technology similar to Amazon Flow, which allows users to take a picture of an object, search for it on Amazon, and then buy it. The technology that Slyce is developing is different in that it is being built to work with a wide variety of retail companies that have partnered with Slyce.

To put it simply, Slyce is not developing a standalone application so much as it is developing a platform. While a product like Amazon Flow is built to only be used with Amazon, Slyce is working to partner with various retailers to build similar apps on the Slyce platform. Currently, Slyce is partnered with retailers like Target, Toys “R” Us, Best Buy, Staples, and Ace Hardware. By partnering with Slyce, these retailers can integrate Slyce’s technology with their existing mobile apps, allowing users to shop by taking pictures with their smartphones. As some have explained it, Slyce is looking to build Amazon Flow for the rest of retail.

Another key detail that sets Slyce apart from Amazon’s offering is that Amazon Flow is built to work with products in their original packaging. This is something of a limitation for Flow, but it does allow Amazon to capitalize on the “showroom effect”, where users go to a physical store to see a product in person, but want to use the price and information research abilities of Amazon. Slyce, on the other hand, is building its technology to excel at image recognition in any setting. Flow uses logo, text, and packaging recognition to search for and recognize objects. Slyce instead builds models of attributes of each product, so they can be recognized in any setting. For example, Slyce first tries to determine what type of product an object is: clothing, toy, electronics, etc. Once it has determined this, like if Slyce has recognized that it is looking at a shirt, it looks at specific details of the object: color, size, pattern, even down to the number of buttons on the shirt and the spacing between those buttons. This allows Slyce to find the exact object the user is searching for, and direct that user to that object’s listing on the retailer’s site.

Slyce is shaping up to be a very versatile and useful product. It will definitely be interesting to see how it progresses in the future, as it already has the support of numerous retailers, and the financial support of a number of private investors. Slyce and its visual search and recognition technology will definitely be something to keep an eye on.