Author Alastair Borthwick Shares The Mountaineering And Hiking Fad

Alastair Borthwick was the author of two famous Scottish books, the first of which was “Always a Little Further“. Born in 1913, he wrote this book about climbing and mountaineering. When he wrote this book this type of literature was pretty dry and uninvolving. He approached this topic in a lively and engaging manner and people still read it to this day.

This book captures the movement of unemployed and working-class folk from Glasgow and Clydebank going off into the hills for an adventure. There was mass unemployment in Scotland at the time and so there were a lot of men and women with a lot of time on their hands but not much in the way of money. To stave away boredom they would head into the hills and mountains right next to these cities.

Before the 1930s, Alastair Borthwick wrote that climbing mountains and hills was an upper-class hobby. Regular people started to enter the West Highlands which had been pretty much exclusively used by wealthy people. As one historian put it, it was as a group of low-income people just happened to take up the sport of polo or go grouse-shooting.

Alastair Borthwick began his career at age 16. He was hired by the Glasgow Evening Herald as what they called a “telephone boy”. This meant he would answer the phone when it rang and write down what correspondents in the field would relay to him. He soon found a higher-level position at the Glasgow Weekly Herald. This newspaper had just five employees and 28 pages to fill so everyone chipped in on the writing, including him.

After he had his first book published he became a radio broadcaster, working for the BBC. Alastair Borthwick (@AlastairBorthw1) was very talented at this and he was very relaxed and friendly sounding unlike others in the business who took on a very formal tone. He later served in World War II and afterward became a television broadcaster. He had married before the war and had one son. He spent his later years on a farm in Ayrshire and passed away in 2003.

Read this post here: https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/alastair-borthwick-gf0fkwlb07r